Sun Facts

Sun Facts

The sun accelerates skin aging, producing fine and coarse facial lines and changing the texture and color of the skin, causing age spots and broken blood vessels. Prolonged tanning over a period of several years can cause the skin to become permanently thickened and discolored, inevitably resulting in premature wrinkling and skin lesions.

  • Skin Cancer is the most common of all cancers, the easiest to detect, and one of the most preventable.
  • More than 1 million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed in the United States this year.
  • One person dies of Melanoma every 67 minutes.
  • Skin Cancers kill more women in their late 20’s to early 30’s than breast cancer As little as 2 minutes of sun exposure is enough to begin the production of UV free radical damage.
  • Sunscreens are not created equal! There are two types of sunscreens, chemical and physical. Chemical screens need to be applied at least 15 to 20 minutes prior to sun exposure and will only filter UVB rays, leaving you unprotected from harmful UVA damage. The second type sunscreen is classified as a physical block. Physical sunblocks contain either Zinc Oxide or titanium dioxide and provide immediate protection upon application from both UVA and UVB damage.
  • Chemical sunscreens are absorbed by the skin and can often be irritating especially to sensitive skin.
  • UV radiation produced by the sun can be as detrimental on a cloudy day as a sunny one.
  • Sun protection, such as Solar Shade SPF 45, is needed when you are using any products containing AHA's, glycolics, retinoids (Retin-A™/Renova™), or any other type of exfoliant, as well as certain medications and supplements, as they can cause the skin to be more sensitive to sun exposure.
  • 90% of women have some type of pigmentation problems due to pregnancy, (melasma), hormones, birth control pills, and sun damage.
  • According to a recent study conducted by dermatologist, the reflection of the sun in addition to the direct sunlight can add an additional 40% ultraviolet intensity to that exposure. In addition, ultraviolet intensities at altitudes of 8,000 to 11,000 feet have been shown to be 60 to 80% higher than at sea level for the same altitude. Remember this winter as you hit the slopes to apply ColorShade SPF 30+ and SolarShade SPF 45.

Source: American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, Cosmetic Dermatology

 

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